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Extract from an email from Uncle Bino, 3.11.09:
Kia ora all, much have been said about our mum's (Nana's) whanau and very little is told of our Dad's (Grand-dad's) whanau. With the help of brother Hune's article on Te Waimatao, Sherwood Kupenga's whanau whakapapa, court records found by Sam and land information found by Cliff I have been able to complete this article which will allow us to appreciate our dad's (grand-dad's) whakapapa, tribal link, whanau and history. The whakapapa I earlier compilled on Hoterene Karaka Senior will compliment this document Stella, when you have time can you include this article on our website message board where only whanau can access it. Regards Dad/uncle

HENERIATA TE WAIMATAO KARAKA 

6th. February 2006 

Author – Hune Poi FOX 

Tena koe Karen, 
 

(1)  A nei etahi korero e paana ki to tatau tipuna kia Te Waimatao.

    The two whakapapa that I have enclosed, one compiled by SherwoodKupenga and the other by me illustrates the affiliation of our tipuna Te Waimatao to all the marae’s within the boundaries of Te Aitanga-a-Mate orbit. 

    (2) The father of Te Waimatao and her brother Haumaroro is Hoterene Karaka of Te Aitanga-a-Mate hapu or subtribe. 

      Their mother, Heneriata was from Waimana and of Tuhoe extraction.

    We have very little information on Te Waimatao’s mother, its an area that I hope to research in the very near future. 

    (3) Te Waimatao was raised at Whareponga along with her cousin Titihuia Whitehead by one Marara Tangikuku who according to some authority was a substantive land owner in the whareponga area, she had no children of her own. 

    (4) Te Waimatao as a young girl was taken to Harataunga in the Coromandel where she married one Himiona Tinotahi., a man from that region.

    By Himiona Te Waimatao had four children, Merearihi, Himiona, Ema and Te Owaina.

    In a relationship with a pakeha named Hillman, Te Waimatao had him a son, Kawhia (Bob) Clarke. 

    (5) Kawhia for a while lived at Porahu and then at the Pahi before migrating to the poverty Bay and finally settled at Te Karaka with his large family. Eddie Clarke a grandson of Kawhia is currently residing at Ruatorea.

    Information regarding Te Waimatao’s earlier family life in the Coromandel is rather sparse. However, she did tell us that she use to work in the gumfields for a living, digging for kauri gums. (kapia) 

    (6) Gun digging was a major industry in the Coromandel and the far north in those days. One of Te Waimatao;s treasured keepsake was a piece of kauri gum, she often showed it to us and as well talked about the various use of kauri gum. 

    (7) When Merearihi reached maturity she started to work in the schools and in time became a teacher and was posted to a school somewhere in North Auckland. It was during this time that Te Waimatao decided to return to her beloved Whareponga. She had not long given birth to her last child Te Owaina. Her fostered mother had promised her a share of the land to live on. On her arrival at Whareponga, Te Waimatao was informed that all the land around Whareponga has been processed and put through the Maori Land Court. By but a few without much iwi consultation. Te Waimatao was hurt when she realised that she was excluded from the land claims at Whareponga. She carried this grief to her grave. 

    (8) I believe that this turn of event in view of the many years that it had elapsed did cause a lot of animosity and hurt, Te Waimatao was not the only one involved on the issue, there were others. 

    Reference to the above event resurfaced at a recent gathering at Hiruharama. 

    Regardless of what had transpired during her absent in Coromandel, Te Waimatao was not deterred by the outcome of the land issue, her mind was made up to live the rest of her life at Whareponga. 

    After a year living at Whareponga, Te Waimatao received word from Merearihi that she had given birth to a baby boy and that she intended to marry the father of her child.

    After some thought Te Waimatao decided to travel north with her own child and spend sometimes with her first mokopuna. 

    (9) Te Waimatao at first had no objection to the union of her daughter with her partner until she found out that he was half Ngapuhi. This information was a bolt from the blue for Te Waimatao, she vowed within her to terminate the relationship at whatever the cost. 

    Te Waimatao’s resentment of Ngapuhi people is not an isolated affair, but one shared by all Ngati-Porou people in consequence of the unprovoked 1820’s Ngapuhi musket raids of Ngati-Porou by Pomare the Napuhi chief and his warriors. 

    (10) The slaughter of men, women and children in large numbers by these raiders from the north were still deeply rooted in the minds and hearts of the Ngati-Porou people and Te Waimatao was no exception. 

    Te Waimatao concealed her disappointment from Merearihi and at the same time was piecing together a plot to lure her daughter back to Tairawhiti and away from her Ngapuhi partner. 

    As daily life fell into a routine and all suspense removed, Te Waimatao was ready to carry out her plan.

    As usual Merearihi would get up in the morning, get ready and then she was off to her place of employment. 

    (11) Te Waimatao wasted no time in packing all the baby’s belongings together and began her journey back to Whareponga with Merearihi’s baby as well as her own child Te Owaina. 

    Food for the baby was never going to be a problem because Te Waimatao was at the time was breast feeding her own child and therefore was able to  give Merearihi’s baby all the nourishment that he needed. 

    In the meanwhile back in Northland, Merearihi returned home from work that afternoon to find the house empty, her mother and the two little ones had disappeared. 

    Confused and in dismay Merearihi could not understand why her mother could do such a cruel act on her. However, the one thing she did know at that point in time that her mother and her baby were now well on their way back to Whareponga. 

    (12) Having reached Whareponga after her long journey back from the north, Te Waimatao was now certain that she had accomplished the most important part of her plan and that the final act was just a matter of waiting. 

    During this time Te Waimatao was not idle. She was on the prowl among the locals, her mission to find a suitable bachelor for a husband for her daughter Merearihi. 

    In the meanwhile back in North Auckland the situation for Merearihi was going from bad to worse, the anxiety and yearning was setting in, the scenario had also made it difficult for her to focus in the work place. 

    (13) Merearihi decided to terminate her employment and return to Whareponga to be with her child, but unknown to her that by doing so, she was about to seal her fate. 

    Te Waimatao had played her cards cleverly, the waiting was over and Merearihi was home. There was no way Te Waimatao was going to let her out of her sight. 

    At the time of Merearihi’s return to Whareponga, Te Waimatao had not at that time settled on who the suitor was for her daughter, granted that she had several prospects on her mind she decided to wait and debate on the issue a little longer, and in doing so the partner of Merearihi who’s name was Jack Morris arrived in the area looking for his partner and child. He was subjected to abuse and threat by Te Waimatao and also by local clans on Ngati-Porou people. 

    (14) The seriousness of the threat was enough to convince the Ngapuhi that his only refuge out of the hostile situation was elsewhere from the region, so he decided to abandon his mission and return to the north. 

    Merearihi, when made aware of the state of affairs was naturally upset but to no avail, she was forbidden by Te Waimatao from having anything more to do with her Ngapuhi partner. 

    It was now all too clear to Merearihi the reason for her mothers visit and abduction of her child. 

    (15) This turn of event had played a cruel role in the life of Merearihi, a promising career, a loving partner and also unknown to her at the time that she would never mother her first child. 

    Te Waimatao was apprehensive after the visit by the Ngapuhi and decided to marry Merearihi sooner than later to ease the situation should the Ngapuhi make another attempt to lure Merearihi out of the district. 

    Te Waimatao wasted no time in making the announcement of the betrothal (Taumautanga) of Merearihi to a local gentleman whose name was Wiremu Pahau. 

    The marriage of Merearihi and Wiremu Pahau took place shortly after the event. 

    (16) Merearihi and Wiremu Pahau lived and raised a large family at Te Aotane, a place situated on the banks of the Mata river which was accessible by Whakapaurangi Road. 

    Subsequent to the above event a fever (Piwa) epidemic swept throughout the Tairawhiti district with devastating impact on many young lives, one of the casualties was Te Owaina the youngest child of Te Waimatao. 

      Te Owaina is buried at Te Kura-a-Poutama cemetary at Ruatorea. 

    (17) Te Waimatao kept Merearihi’s child and raised him, she named him after his father Hoterene Karaka, The child of Merearihi subsequently became the father of the Fox family living at the Porahu. 

    Te Iharaira Pokiha (Fox) was a lone figure farming in the upper Maraehara Valley on land known as Porahu.

    His relations who were also farming on the land blocks close by in the locality felt sorry for him being on his own and thought that a partner for him would infuse some quality to improve his living standard on his property. 

    After much debate, Te Iharaira’s relations decided to go to Whareponga in search for a partner for their cousin.

    To meet the criteria the woman they were seeking for was one that was sincere as well as being resilient in order to endure the harsh and lonely environment of the Porahu. 

    (17) Te Waimatao was one of the kind that fitted into that category and the very reason that brought Te Iharaira’s relations to her doorstep with their proposal.

    After a brief meeting, Te Waimatao agreed to the proposition, she then gathered up her belongings and with little Hoterene departed from Whareponga, en-route to Porahu with the group. 

    Te Iharaira accepted the arrangement with approval and respect, the union was a success, Te Iharaira adopted Hoterene. 

    Sometime later Te Iharaira and Te Waimatao adopted aunty Mate Ngata the second last child of Apirana and Arihia Ngata, she was three (3) days old when taken to Porahu. 

    (18) This was also the case with aunty Waina Green the daughter of Peti and Totorewa Green, Te Waimatao named her after her child Te Owaina who died during the fever epidemic. 

    They later raised Whareraima (Wally or Ware) Pahau, he was three (3) years old at the time. 

    Te Aowera marae in the past was a place of assembly for the Ringatu faith, Te Waimatao was a strong advocate of the religion and was always present during these mass. 

    On one visit to Te Aowera, she decided to visit her daughter at Te Aotane, on her arrival, she noticed that Whareraima then three(3) years old was covered in scabies (Hakihaki) and sores (Patito) she decided to take him back with her to the Porahu.

    At the Porahu Te Waimatao submersed Whareraima in the cold Maraehara river before sunrise every morning, by the seventh day all the scabies and sores had disappeared from Whareraima’s body. 

    (19) On a visit to a Ringatu mass at Te Aowera, Te Waimatao took Whareraima with her, on seeing her child, Merearihi wanted him back, but Te Waimatao refused to give him up, so Whareraima became the fourth person to be raised at the Porahu. 

    The name Whareraima is associated with the vault (Whareraima) at the rear of Te Aowera Marae, it belongs to Renata, son of Hera Haereroa. 

    (20) When Whareraima reached maturity he enrolled in the army to go overseas to fight in the second world war. On final leave he returned home to the Porahu. Whareraima got as far as the home crossing, Maraehara river was running high after days of continued rain, this made it impossible for anyone ford. 

    (21) Te Waimatao with us the mokos came down to the river on the home-side and Whareraima above the roar of the river on the other side was waving and shouting out his farewell. Te Waimatao in turn was wailing, tears streaming down from her eyes as she bid farewell (Poroporoaki) to her mokopuna. We asked her why she was crying, she said, “Ware will never return home let alone his own country” 

      Her intuition was correct. 

    (22) Te Iharaira bethrothed his niece Mei Hovell as wife for Hoterene, the marriage was a significant one in terms of genes when the grandchildren arrives and also the knowledge that the grandchildren are truly and equally belongs to them both.

    The union produced thirteen (13) grand children for Te Waimatao and Te Iharaira. 

    (23) Himiona, the son of Te Waimatao had no issue, Ema, the second daughter married George Kelly he was an American, they had two children, Girley a daughter and George a son. When Ema died, George senior returned to America taking his daughter with him, leaving little George in the care of Te Waimatao at Porahu. 

    Unfortunately the boat that was taking the Kelly’s overseas sank in rough weather, George Senior went down with the boat, daughter Girley was rescued and returned to New Zealand and I think she was raised in a convent. However in the mid 1940’s Girley was briefly reunited with some of her relations while nursing at Te Puia Hospital and during this time she met and married a chap by the name of Ray Preston who was at the time working as a clerk for the Waiapu County Council. 

    After sometime in Te Puia the couple moved to Gisborne where they raised a family. Some members of the family still live in Gisborne today. 

    (24) Young George Kelly was cared for by Te Waimatao at Porahu, he died at a young age and had no issue. 

    (25) I have described Te Waimatao in my previous notes as being a big and robust and in many ways built like a man. 

    The stories passed on to us by others of her fights with members of her own sex suggested that she never came off second best.

    Men were no exception, In one such encounter we were told that she beat the hell out of this man by grabbing his testicles and never letting go. 

    Much of what has been said about Te Waimatao seem to portray her s being villainous, this is not true, as a matter of fact it is quite the opposite. We see our tipuna as a sincere, caring and loving person to all her mokopuna’s and relations and if there was anything to mar that personality then that would have to be her over protective nature when it comes to her grandchildren 

    (26) Te Waimatao’s relations are the Tamati’s, the Pipi’s, the Rangiwai’s and the Kirikino’s. 

    (27) Te Waimatao is buried in the Porahu cemetery with her beloved koroua Te Iharaira, surrounded by their moko’s those who went before them and those that followed after.

Ka mutu. 

Kua pakaru te mihini. 
 

For the purpose of analysis, I have numbers each paragraph of the above article on our tipuna Te Waimatao 
 

Analysis of Item (1) The following two whakapapa’s compiled by June Fox & Sherwood Kupenga is self explanatory. I have compiled a more detailed whakapapa of descendents of Hoterene Karaka Snr. This is displayed for the whanau on the Porahu Website.                             

Your browser may not support display of this image.                             Porourangi = Hamo te rangi

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Hauterangi             =    Tamateatoia  RONGOMAIANIWANIWA = Tawakika

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Rakaipo                =     Hinehuhuritai         Aoarere

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Rakaiwetenga        =    Te Wakatotara        Haupunoke

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Tapuatehaurangi   =     Ngauruwhakirangi    Tumaurirere

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Your browser may not support display of this image. Your browser may not support display of this image. Your browser may not support display of this image. Rakaimoehau        =     Tangihaereroa   Hinekehu = Tangihiakotea    RONGOWHAKAATA              

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Your browser may not support display of this image. POROUMATA             =    Whaena Moerua                            Tawakerahui

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Your browser may not support display of this image. Your browser may not support display of this image. MATEROA = Tamaterongo 

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Rongotehengia       =     Hinetapurangi   Poroungarongo

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Your browser may not support display of this image. Tutauruhira*** =   Kuratau       Puatehau

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Te Aokapua   =   Raukohe    Tutotonui

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Your browser may not support display of this image. Tuterangi-wehi-wehi   =   Te Waiharia      KAPOHANGA = Tuterangipaku

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Your browser may not support display of this image.        Kokere = Manukaipo

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Your browser may not support display of this image.       Koroto 

                Tokotapu                                                    *** Brother of PAKANUI

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                Ketekai

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                  Hohepa Kaikapa

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Your browser may not support display of this image.   HOTERENE KARAKA = W1 = Heneri (No Tuhoe)  Hoani Kaikapa

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Your browser may not support display of this image.                = W2 = Hipora Rakau           (Kirikino whanau) 

TE WAIMATAO  H1 = Himiona Tinotahi,

(Heneriatta Karaka)  H2 = Hillman  (Pakeha)

                  H3 = Kopani

            H4 = TE IHARAIRA POKIHA  

            Sherwood Kupenga’s  Whakapapa 

                UENUKU

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      PAIKEA    RUATAPU  Rongoueroa  Irakaiputahi

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Your browser may not support display of this image. Kahukuraao 
 

Kahukura Tamahoka

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Your browser may not support display of this image. Kahukura Mamangu 
 

Kahukura Poro

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Kuratau = Tuteuruhira  (Brother of PAKANUI whom was killed at Nuhaka)

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     Te Aokapua = Raukohe

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            Tuterangiwehiwehi = Waiharia

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                    Kokere = Manukaipo   (Daughter of KAPOHANGA) 

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Your browser may not support display of this image. Koroto

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Tokotapu

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Ketekai

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Hohepa Kaikapa

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HOTERENE KARAKA                         Hoani Kaikapa

W1 = Heneri (Tuhoe)   W2  =  Hipora Rakau

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TE WAIMATAO (Heneriatta Karaka)  Haumaroro (Hataraka)

H1 = Himiona Tinotahi

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Merearihi

P1 = Jack Morris H2 = Wiremu Pahau

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Hoterene Karaka

=

  Edith Mei Hovell.

Analysis of item (1)

The whakapapa indicates linkage back to Porourangi and  Uenuku.

However, the whakapapa by June tend to indicate the generations more precisely.

Considering each generation generally spans 25 years.  

Analysis of item (2)

Hoterene Karaka Snr. was born in the district of Waiapu Cr. 1850. His first partner Heneri Ngatai who was from Waimana is closely related to Hopa Henara Tukairangi. His second wife Hipora Rakau who was born Cr. 1855 was the daughter of one Paora Tukunoa (f)  

Records indicate that Hoterene and Hipora both of Waiapu married in 1872. 

Hopa Hemara Tukairangi was a substantial land owner of Mareahara. His parcel of land was won in a ballot. The area includes the hill area facing Porahu and Mangarua. (Authority Aunty Mate Kaiwai & Uncle Tipene Ngata) 

Analysis of item (3)

There were two women in Whareponga during the early/mid. 1800’s by the name Tangikuku. They were Marara and Makere Tangikuku. One Makere being the mother of Tohunga Mohi Turei. (Authority Aunty Mate Kaiwai)

.

Analysis of item (4)

Te Waimatao is a substantive land owner in the area of Kennedy Bay, Coromandel. 

The relationship with a Pakeha man Hillman was a one night stand from which resulted in Mauhana Hillman (Hiramana) ‘Na te patara wehike noiho e tiki atu” “It only took a bottle of whiskey to lure him”

(Authority Mum) 

Analysis of item (5)

Whilst residing at Porahu Kawhia Hillman lived in a single room building near the stock yards, hence the name given to the area ‘Whare-raro’

(Authority Mum) 

Analysis of item (6)

Self explanatory, nil comments required. 

Analysis of item (7)

It appears that while Waimatao and others who had land interest in Whareponga was absent from the area a Materoa Reedy nee Ngarimu and others decided to put the Whareponga land issue through the Maori land Court. 

“Na Materoa taua mahi ra. Whakapatipatitia te tiati,  whakahaurangitia, atahi ano ka hainatia nga pepa whenue kia nga mea kare no ratau te whenua” 

.”Materoa was responsible for the injustice. They coerced the Land Court Judge with alcohol and had him sign the land over to a few.”

(Authority Aunty Mate Kaiwai) 

Analysis of item (8)

It is important to stress that Merearihi’s partner was more Pakeha than Maori.

During the 1960’s Mum and the whanau met with Jack Morris and his whanau at Rua’s rental place in Papatoetoe – Auckland. The Morris whanau appear to be more Pakeha. 

Had Merearihi nor Jack Morris indicated to Te waimatao that he had Ngapuhi blood in him, Te Waimatao may not have realized his tribal linkage and therefore would not have taken the course of action she did. 

Furthermore, had Merearihi married Jack Morris she may not have died at a very young age.

(Authority, mum)  

Analysis of item (9)

The 1820 Ngapuhi raids also claimed the life of our tipuna Poroaki at Whetumatarau.

(Authority, Manuel Jose – Olive branches) 

Analysis of item (10) Nil 

Analysis of item (11) Nil 

Analysis of item (12) Nil 

Analysis of item (13) Nil 

Analysis of item (14) Nil 

Analysis of item (15)

The union with Wiremu Pahau produced seven children, two girls and five were boys.

Of the Boys Whareraima, George and Watene were members of the28th. Maori Battalion. Of the girls Bella also served in the army. 

The last in the Pahau family was Te Mauhue.

.

Merearihi died at a very young age of birth complications. 

The night Merearihi passed away at Te Aotane, Te Waimatao who was at the Porahu saw in her dream a number of old people who had long passed away. they were in a circle. In the middle of the circle was Merearihi.

 

Te Waimatao woke up in the middle of the night and began crying. Te iharaira came in and asked why she was crying, Te Waimatao told him of her dream. They caught their horses in the middle of the night and rode to Te Aotane. When they arrived Merearihi was dead, her baby Te Mahue was barely alive. Her husband Wiremu Pahau was at the pub with his mates. 

Little Te Mahua was taken back to Porahu where he later died. 

Te Mauhue was the first to be buried at the Porahu family cemetery (1926) 

Brother Rua is named after Te Mahue

Hence ‘Rua huihui Te mahua wehewehe’ (Rua who died after separating from his mothers womb)

 (Authority, mum) 

Analysis of Item (16) Nil 

Analysis of item (17)

Te Iharaira Pokiha was a grand-nephew of Major Ropata Wahawaha. Ropata’s sister Ritihia married Mathew Fox who had Hata-te-kani Pokiha, father of Te Iharaira.

Te Iharaira’s mother was Manuel Jose’s daughter Makarita.

(Authority Whakapapa) 

Analysis of item (18)  

Te Waimatao and Te Iharaira worked tirelessly to clear the thick native bush in and around Porahu to prepare it for farming. Large native tree stump at Waitaha are indications of the tenacity of these two pioneers.

(Authority Mum) 

Analysis of item (19) Nil 

Analysis of item (20)

From my understanding, Maku Turei and Puna Mackay came with Whareraima to Porahu before they departed with the 28th. Maori Battalion. Puna and Maku’s horse managed to swim across the swollen river, but Whareraima’s horse could not swim. It was Puna and Maku who alerted Te Waimatao that Whareraima was on the other side of the swollen river.

(Authority mum)  

Analysis of item (21)

Whareraima was killed in action in Florence, Italy as a consequence of an explosion at an oil and ammunition dump they were guarding. His body was never found.

The instance he was killed, his wairua came to Te Waimatao.

In the middle of the night Te Waimatao saw Whareraima in full military uniform standing at the end of her bed. His head bowed. 

Te Waimatao called his name, as his image faded into the darkness. Te Waimatao began crying. Te Iharaira came into the room to asked why she was crying, Te Waimatao said that Whareraima had passed away. 

Late the next day the phone rang to confirm Whareraima’s passing away. 

Analysis of item (22)

Mum (Edith Mei Hovell) and not dad (Hoterene Karaka) who was genetically related to Te Iharaira. Te Iharaira’s mother and mum’s grand-mother were sisters and daughters of Manuel Jose and Tapita. Mum was Te Iharaira’s neice.  

Te Iharaira personally approached and asked Peti Lima for mum to marry his adopted son our dad. 

Analysis of item (23)

Himiona Tinotahi resided at Porahu for sometime with us. He enlisted and went to Gallipoli under the name of John Anderson (Brother John was named after Himiona) during World War 1. Soon after landing at Gallipoli a Turkish shell exploded centimeter from them, killing those around him. Himiona was severely wounded in the explosion. The impact of the shell damaged most of his private parts. He was hospitalised for a period and returned home. 

Without his private parts intact, Himiona decided both mentally and physically to become a woman. Hence his new title Nanny Himiona. 

Himiona mastered the arts of cooking and dress making. 

Analysis of item (24)

Mum named me after George Kelly, who was often referred to as (Paapi) 

Dad and Te Iharaira named me ‘Houkamau’ after the ngatiporou chief of Wharekahika (Hicks Bay). My Maori land Court documents are under Houkamau Fox. 

Analysis of item (25)

Tipene Ngata often relived some of those stories of our tipuna Te Waimatao.

Mum would often talk about the power of Te Waimatao in fights against her cousin Hukarere from Whareponga (Later to reside at Maraehara) and even with her husband Te Iharaira.  

Analysis of item (26) Nil 

Analysis of item (27) Nil 
 

GK Clarke

George Kelly Clarke

November 2009







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